BREAKING: Columbia vanquishes Dartmouth in U.S.N.&W.R. College Rankings, world stops

Look how Mort's puppets dance!After stinging criticism that the U.S. News & World Report‘s annual college rankings were “dubious” and possibly even damaging to low-income students (leading to many safety schools small liberal arts colleges boycotting the whole process), the magazine vowed greater transparency and “substantial changes in methodology”. Today, we can see what a radical changes Mort Zuckerman has wrought (or not), and how the results are sure to send the insecure into spasms of self-doubt once more.

Here’s how the Ivies stacked up:

1. Princeton University (NJ) (2007: Ranked 1st)
2. Harvard University (MA)  (2007: Ranked 2nd)
3. Yale University (CT) (2007: Ranked 3rd)
5.   University of Pennsylvania (2007: Ranked 7th)
9.  Columbia University (NY)   (2007: Ranked 9th)
11. Dartmouth College (NH) (2007: Ranked 9th)
12. Cornell University (NY)  (2007: Ranked 12th)
14. Brown University (RI) (2007: Ranked 15th)

See the release in all its embargoed glory and the top 25 schools after the jump.

–MICHAEL MORISY

EMBARGOED UNTIL 12:01 AM ET
ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 2007

Princeton, Harvard, and Yale Lead U.S.News & World Report’s

Annual Ranking of Best National Universities
Williams, Amherst, and Swarthmore Take Top Spots among Best Liberal Arts Colleges

Washington, DC – August 17, 2007 – Three of the most visible names in higher education, Princeton University, Harvard University, and Yale University, top the 2008 edition of “America’s Best Colleges” by U.S.News & World Report, the nation’s leading source of service journalism and news.  The exclusive rankings – which this year feature some substantial changes in methodology – will be published in the magazine’s August 27 issue, on newsstands Monday, August 20, and available online at www.usnews.com/colleges beginning today.

The annual rankings – in which U.S. News groups schools based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching – provide an unmatched resource for parents and students contemplating one of life’s most challenging financial decisions.  Among top liberal arts colleges, categorized by the Carnegie Foundation for their emphasis on undergraduate education and awarding at least half of their degrees in arts and science, were Williams College, Amherst College, and Swarthmore College.

“For nearly a quarter century, consulting the U.S.News & World Report rankings has been a vital first step for prospective college students and their parents in the complex process of determining which institution best fits their goals,” said U.S.News & World Report’s editor, Brian Kelly. “Designed as a one-stop resource, the rankings supply hard data and analysis to help college applicants make apples-to-apples comparisons of schools across the country.  Through these rankings, and the ‘America’s Best Colleges’ guidebook, our goal is to help equip students and their families to make a knowledgeable decision based on clear, comparative research.”

Using a proprietary methodology, the annual U.S.News & World Report rankings represent the most comprehensive look at how schools stack up based on a set of 15 widely accepted indicators of excellence, and help consumers evaluate and compare data compiled from more than 1,400 accredited four-year schools.  Changes in the U.S.News & World Report methodology for the 2008 edition include:

Category changes – Since U.S.News & World Report categorizes schools based on the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications, many schools changed from one U.S.News & World Report ranking category to another due to the foundation’s recently announced “2006 Basic version.”  Schools that switched categories since last year’s rankings as a result (more than 200) or that are ranked for the first time (55 in all) are noted in the tables.

Military service academies now included – Due to the new Carnegie Classification changes, the U.S. service academies – Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine – are ranked for the first time, and all ranked as the top public school in their respective categories.  The U.S. Naval Academy (MD) and the U.S. Military Academy (NY) ranked among the top 25 liberal arts colleges: 20th and 22nd respectively.  In the list of Best Baccalaureate Colleges, which are grouped by region, the U.S. Air Force Academy (CO) topped the list of schools in the West; and the U.S. Coast Guard (CT) and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (NY) were in the top 10 for the North:  2nd and 7th respectively.

Pell Grants are a new ranking criterion – The percentage of Pell Grant recipients attending a school is now one of the variables used to calculate the “graduation rate performance” measure for national universities and liberal arts colleges.  Because many schools include as part of their mission a focus on educating students from low-income families, the inclusion of this data enables schools with a high proportion of Pell Grant recipients to be measured more accurately against those with fewer recipients in terms of graduation rates.  Pell Grants are not used as part of any other ranking component.

Unranked schools are now listed differently – Unranked schools, which had been listed together alphabetically in a single, separate table, now appear in groups beneath the category in which they would have been ranked.  Because some schools are unable to report key educational statistics, or because they have certain other characteristics (nontraditional first-year students, small overall enrollment, etc.), it would not be statistically valid to compare them with other schools.  In addition, institutions that have indicated that they don’t use SAT and ACT scores in admission decisions for first time first-year, degree-seeking applicants now also are included in the list of unranked schools, footnoted as such.

New category title – The category formerly titled “Comprehensive Colleges-Bachelor’s” has been re-named “Baccalaureate Colleges” to better clarify the broad educational mission of these schools.

A complete summary of the methodology used to rank each school can be found online at www.usnews.com/colleges

Best National Universities
1. Princeton University (NJ)
2. Harvard University (MA)
3. Yale University (CT)
4. Stanford University (CA)
5. California Institute of Technology
University of Pennsylvania
7.  Massachusetts Inst. Of Technology
8.  Duke University (NC)
9.  Columbia University (NY)
University of Chicago
11. Dartmouth College (NH)
12. Cornell University (NY)
Washington University in St. Louis
14. Brown University (RI)
Johns Hopkins University (MD)
Northwestern University (IL)
17. Emory University (GA)
Rice University (TX)
19. University of Notre Dame (IN)
Vanderbilt University (TN)
21. University of California – Berkeley
22. Carnegie Mellon University (PA)
23. Georgetown University (DC)
University of Virginia
25. University of California – Los Angeles
University of Michigan – Ann Arbor

Best Liberal Arts Colleges
1.Williams College (MA)
2.Amherst College (MA)
3.Swarthmore College (PA)
4.Wellesley College (MA)
5.Carleton College (MN)
Middlebury College (VT) (UPDATED!)
7.Bowdoin College (ME)
Pomona College (CA)
9. Davidson College (NC)
10. Haverford College (PA)
11. Claremont McKenna College (CA)
Grinnell College (IA)
Vassar College (NY)
Wesleyan College (CT)
15. Harvey Mudd College (CA)
Washington and Lee University (VA)
17.Colgate University (NY)
Hamilton College (NY)
Smith College (MA)
20. Oberlin College (OH)
United States Naval Academy (MD)
22. Colby College (ME)
United States Military Academy (NY)
24. Bates College (ME)
Bryn Mawr (PA)

 

*Just kidding! We know you’re really hidden Ivies just waiting to transform into a beautiful, special snowflake of specialness!

Edit: Pretty-ified the release and fixed a number.

463 Responses to “BREAKING: Columbia vanquishes Dartmouth in U.S.N.&W.R. College Rankings, world stops”

  1. jazzarini Says:

    To Dartmouth96:
    You’re an idiot and snobbish asshole. Get with the times. The Penn of the early-mid 90s (read: when your friends might have attended it) was NOT the Penn of today. It boasted a 50% acceptance rate. It was horrible, easily at the bottom of the Ivy League barrel.
    The Penn of today is approaching the top. Rodin, and Guttman following her, have continued to slow yet inevitable lowering of the SAS acceptance rate. It is now LOWER than Wharton’s (11% vs Wharton’s 16% and nursing and SEAS even higher rates). Its SAT average is only 14 points lower, arguably negligible.
    Dartmouth is WORSE THAN PENN TODAY. This is a fact. I’m sorry.

    4 of my friends chose Penn over Columbia. I myself was merely waitlisted there, but that’s only indicative of the crap-shoot, not the quality. Penn is a better school. That’s all. Thank you and good night.

  2. jazzarini Says:

    To Dartmouth96:
    You’re an idiot and snobbish asshole. Get with the times. The Penn of the early-mid 90s (read: when your friends might have attended it) was NOT the Penn of today. It boasted a 50% acceptance rate. It was horrible, easily at the bottom of the Ivy League barrel.
    The Penn of today is approaching the top. Rodin, and Guttman following her, have continued to slow yet inevitable lowering of the SAS acceptance rate. It is now LOWER than Wharton’s (11% vs Wharton’s 16% and nursing and SEAS even higher rates). Its SAT average is only 14 points lower, arguably negligible.
    Dartmouth is WORSE THAN PENN TODAY. This is a fact. I’m sorry.

    4 of my friends chose Penn over Columbia. I myself was merely waitlisted there, but that’s only indicative of the crap-shoot, not the quality. Penn is a better school. That’s all. Thank you and good night.

  3. Dartmouth/Wharton Alum Says:

    Okay,

    I’ve heard all sorts of idiotic comments here and some good ones.
    But Jazzarini has brought out my ire…

    I went to Dartmouth (Class of 03) and then went to Wharton (Class of ’07).

    You are full of crap. Although I was in the B-school at Penn, I still spent two years around Penn undergrads…

    You say that Dartmouth is WORSE than Penn today? Are you kidding me? The Penn kids weren’t even half the students the undergrads at Dartmouth are (and were during my time there). Penn felt like a big state school. Dartmouth felt like an elite learning community. If it weren’t for Wharton, Penn would be out of the running period. The rest of the school rode our coat tails.

    Penn today is NOT better than Dartmouth. Using your faulty logic, Dartmouth’s acceptance rate is not in decline. Every standard of admission has in fact increased. The budget has increased, the facilities have been improved, and the curriculum has been expanded. How does that translate into worse?

    The main reason for the dartmouth slippage over the past several years has been the fact that dartmouth simply cannot compete with larger schools when it comes to resources. At it’s core Dartmouth is a liberal arts institution. The level of grant driven revenue is just not there. The entire schools population is roughly 5K. On top of this, many alumns have been utterly infuriated by the Trustees’ decision to eliminate democracy from the elections, which has resulted in tons of bad publicity over the past few years. Dartmouth will recover though, as she always does.

    The best 4 years of my life were spent in hanover. Any alum will say the same. How many schools can boast this kind of loyalty. Dartmouth has a sense of place lacking in so many other schools. It’s an experience like none other.

  4. Dartmouth/Wharton Alum Says:

    Okay,

    I’ve heard all sorts of idiotic comments here and some good ones.
    But Jazzarini has brought out my ire…

    I went to Dartmouth (Class of 03) and then went to Wharton (Class of ’07).

    You are full of crap. Although I was in the B-school at Penn, I still spent two years around Penn undergrads…

    You say that Dartmouth is WORSE than Penn today? Are you kidding me? The Penn kids weren’t even half the students the undergrads at Dartmouth are (and were during my time there). Penn felt like a big state school. Dartmouth felt like an elite learning community. If it weren’t for Wharton, Penn would be out of the running period. The rest of the school rode our coat tails.

    Penn today is NOT better than Dartmouth. Using your faulty logic, Dartmouth’s acceptance rate is not in decline. Every standard of admission has in fact increased. The budget has increased, the facilities have been improved, and the curriculum has been expanded. How does that translate into worse?

    The main reason for the dartmouth slippage over the past several years has been the fact that dartmouth simply cannot compete with larger schools when it comes to resources. At it’s core Dartmouth is a liberal arts institution. The level of grant driven revenue is just not there. The entire schools population is roughly 5K. On top of this, many alumns have been utterly infuriated by the Trustees’ decision to eliminate democracy from the elections, which has resulted in tons of bad publicity over the past few years. Dartmouth will recover though, as she always does.

    The best 4 years of my life were spent in hanover. Any alum will say the same. How many schools can boast this kind of loyalty. Dartmouth has a sense of place lacking in so many other schools. It’s an experience like none other.

  5. Real Rankings Says:

    The real ivy rankings are broken into tiers…

    Tier 1: Harvard, Princeton, Yale
    Tier 2: Dartmouth, Columbia, Brown
    Tier 3: Cornell, Penn

    There is a huge drop between Tier 2 and 3.

    I don’t care what the rankings in US News say. In society, this is just a given.

  6. Real Rankings Says:

    The real ivy rankings are broken into tiers…

    Tier 1: Harvard, Princeton, Yale
    Tier 2: Dartmouth, Columbia, Brown
    Tier 3: Cornell, Penn

    There is a huge drop between Tier 2 and 3.

    I don’t care what the rankings in US News say. In society, this is just a given.

  7. Dartmouth09 Says:

    In regards to my peers at the other schools, I really think people need to understand that Dartmouth is purely an undergraduate institution. I’ve taken maybe 5 out of 35 classes with more than 50 people and maybe 10 out of 35 with more than 25. Its all about learning and the professors don’t really care much about their research, and there are virtually no TAs.

    Harvard, Princeton, Yale, etc. are excellent schools, but I definitely think they are inflated by their graduate studies, with Princeton being the exception. I really wish they separated undergraduate from graduate studies in the rankings, and I think Princeton and Dartmouth would be at the top every year. In regards to Penn/Columbia, UPenn is a great school, but I turned it down because no one seemed to like it there, while as every Dartmouth alum got that gleam in their eye when they spoke of the school (I’ll be one of them).

    Nevertheless, with all that said, I would rank the undergraduate education as follows:

    1. Princeton
    2. Dartmouth
    3. Yale
    4. Brown
    5. Harvard
    6. Columbia
    7. UPenn
    8. Cornell

  8. Dartmouth09 Says:

    In regards to my peers at the other schools, I really think people need to understand that Dartmouth is purely an undergraduate institution. I’ve taken maybe 5 out of 35 classes with more than 50 people and maybe 10 out of 35 with more than 25. Its all about learning and the professors don’t really care much about their research, and there are virtually no TAs.

    Harvard, Princeton, Yale, etc. are excellent schools, but I definitely think they are inflated by their graduate studies, with Princeton being the exception. I really wish they separated undergraduate from graduate studies in the rankings, and I think Princeton and Dartmouth would be at the top every year. In regards to Penn/Columbia, UPenn is a great school, but I turned it down because no one seemed to like it there, while as every Dartmouth alum got that gleam in their eye when they spoke of the school (I’ll be one of them).

    Nevertheless, with all that said, I would rank the undergraduate education as follows:

    1. Princeton
    2. Dartmouth
    3. Yale
    4. Brown
    5. Harvard
    6. Columbia
    7. UPenn
    8. Cornell

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  11. Phlangenstein Says:

    Why is everybody shitting on each other? You know most of us might go undergrad at one school and graduate at a completely different school. Why shit on other schools if there’s a possibility of ending up there in a few years? I know the graduate school where I go to college doesn’t accept its own undergraduates.

  12. Phlangenstein Says:

    Why is everybody shitting on each other? You know most of us might go undergrad at one school and graduate at a completely different school. Why shit on other schools if there’s a possibility of ending up there in a few years? I know the graduate school where I go to college doesn’t accept its own undergraduates.

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