Student defrauds Yale, fakes identity, forges transcripts, is probably inking deal for made-for-tv movie as we speak

Student defrauds Yale, fakes identity, forges transcripts, is probably inking deal for made-for-tv movie as we speakYale Daily News reports that a 26-year-old student “defrauded Yale University wholesale,” faking records, transcripts, and major elements of his identity. After burning through $46,000 in financial aid, Yale tried to pull a hush job on the guy-whose name isn’t in the articles-with a quick, quiet dismissal, but the alleged fraud sticking to his “not guilty” plea, Yale and the mysterious man will be airing their dirty laundry in court, starting next week.

The story has so many twisting elements, it reads like a daytime soap: Gay lovers’ spat! Race-related unrest! Forgery, identity theft, mental instability! The defendant may have duped NYU, Columbia, and Yale with falsified transcripts and tales of charitable works in Sri Lanka (probably fake) and a childhood in Trinidad and Tobago (probably real). YDN indulges the byzantine plot here.

Equally distressing (read: disgustingly juicy) is the fact that he made it this far. Records suggest at least four years of financially-aided education, and while we understand that transferring credits can be a total bitch, that’s gotta add up to at least one associate’s degree in “Fraudulent Psychopath,” right? YDN explores college-app forgery here, but really, all you need is this sentence:

The revelation that someone could infiltrate Yale shatters the mystique of the Ivy League as an impregnable bastion of the elite.

Raise the alarm! Our ranks have been broken! We’ll follow this story as it unfolds; so far, my frantic Googling offers zilch; I can’t even find stuff on the September charge.

  • Penn ’10

    You might want to check out “The Runner” by David Samuels if you haven’t already. It deals with a similar story of famous Ivy League impostor James Hogue, who faked his way into Princeton.

  • Penn ’10

    You might want to check out “The Runner” by David Samuels if you haven’t already. It deals with a similar story of famous Ivy League impostor James Hogue, who faked his way into Princeton.

  • InternationalYalie

    Why is the fact that he is from Trinidad and Tobago the only one that is considered probably real? Hey ivygate, I love you but please don’t make dumb insinuations based on where a person is from. How many Trinidadians or Tobagonians have you met in your life?
    So what, an American wouldn’t do something like this? I think you should retract that part of the post…Please don’t encourage people in this country to be even more prejudiced about other places in the world than they already are. SHAME ON YOU!

  • InternationalYalie

    Why is the fact that he is from Trinidad and Tobago the only one that is considered probably real? Hey ivygate, I love you but please don’t make dumb insinuations based on where a person is from. How many Trinidadians or Tobagonians have you met in your life?
    So what, an American wouldn’t do something like this? I think you should retract that part of the post…Please don’t encourage people in this country to be even more prejudiced about other places in the world than they already are. SHAME ON YOU!

  • y11@InternationalYalie

    Typical overly-offended international student. Chill the fuck out. This is the reason we have “Panels on Hate” every weekend.

  • y11@InternationalYalie

    Typical overly-offended international student. Chill the fuck out. This is the reason we have “Panels on Hate” every weekend.

  • semi-anon

    The guy’s name wasn’t Aleksey Vayner, wasn’t it?

  • semi-anon

    The guy’s name wasn’t Aleksey Vayner, wasn’t it?

  • TKB

    y11: seconded. and thirded.

  • Maureen O’Connor

    My designation of the Trinidadi childhood as “probably real” is based on the YDN article, which treats that element as fact; they offer evidence that the Sri Lankan service might have been fabricated or exaggerated.

  • TKB

    y11: seconded. and thirded.

  • Maureen O’Connor

    My designation of the Trinidadi childhood as “probably real” is based on the YDN article, which treats that element as fact; they offer evidence that the Sri Lankan service might have been fabricated or exaggerated.

  • @InternationalYalie

    Some of Maureen’s best friends are from Trinidad and Tobago. Shame on you and your insinuations.

  • @InternationalYalie

    Some of Maureen’s best friends are from Trinidad and Tobago. Shame on you and your insinuations.

  • @InternationalYalie

    The reason it’s considered real is because it’s something that’s harder to fake. Until we know we’re dealing with an Aleksey Vayneresque situation here, we probably want to assume that at least part of the guy’s life history is accurate. I don’t think Maureen’s post was slurring Trinis or Tobagonians in any sense.

  • @InternationalYalie

    The reason it’s considered real is because it’s something that’s harder to fake. Until we know we’re dealing with an Aleksey Vayneresque situation here, we probably want to assume that at least part of the guy’s life history is accurate. I don’t think Maureen’s post was slurring Trinis or Tobagonians in any sense.

  • sb

    i’m not surprised. i know at least 2 illegal aliens who have made it through 4 years of penn with fake identification.

  • sb

    i’m not surprised. i know at least 2 illegal aliens who have made it through 4 years of penn with fake identification.

  • Harvard Man

    First Princeton, now Yale, and in both cases the men go quite undetected and are apparently able to keep up academically. This sort of thing could never happen at Harvard.

  • Harvard Man

    First Princeton, now Yale, and in both cases the men go quite undetected and are apparently able to keep up academically. This sort of thing could never happen at Harvard.

  • his name

    is Akash Maharaj.
    proof:
    http://www.yale.edu/english/undergraduate-prizewinners.html
    one of the few MC ’08 prize winners, in English (he was taking several seminars in English– we can guess that his prize was won in English too)
    Look him up on facebook. 2 entries near the top:
    1. Someone in both Yale and Columbia networks
    2. Someone without a picture, but in the Trinidad/Tobago network.

  • his name

    is Akash Maharaj.
    proof:
    http://www.yale.edu/english/undergraduate-prizewinners.html
    one of the few MC ’08 prize winners, in English (he was taking several seminars in English– we can guess that his prize was won in English too)
    Look him up on facebook. 2 entries near the top:
    1. Someone in both Yale and Columbia networks
    2. Someone without a picture, but in the Trinidad/Tobago network.

  • Yale senior

    His ‘name’ is indeed Akash Maharaj. The YDN absolutely should have published this information–this 26-year-old man is a criminal who made a death threat to another Yale student and defrauded the university. I didn’t know we protected the identity criminals simply because we fear that they might be sufficiently publicly humiliated by the exposure of their crime to commit suicide (a dubious presumption to make).

  • Yale senior

    His ‘name’ is indeed Akash Maharaj. The YDN absolutely should have published this information–this 26-year-old man is a criminal who made a death threat to another Yale student and defrauded the university. I didn’t know we protected the identity criminals simply because we fear that they might be sufficiently publicly humiliated by the exposure of their crime to commit suicide (a dubious presumption to make).

  • bahaha

    he also told the spec that he had originally attended yale, then transferred to columbia, then applied to transfer back to yale.
    http://www.columbiaspectator.com/node/20656

    also: he’s been mentioned in ivygate comments before. as the ex boyfriend of bonesman victor cazares.

  • bahaha

    he also told the spec that he had originally attended yale, then transferred to columbia, then applied to transfer back to yale.
    http://www.columbiaspectator.com/node/20656

    also: he’s been mentioned in ivygate comments before. as the ex boyfriend of bonesman victor cazares.

  • jacksonfive

    I disagree. There’s absolutely nothing relevant about publishing his name even if it’s public record. Let the courts deal with him. And he’s not even convicted yet. You don’t really feel threatened, do you?

  • jacksonfive

    I disagree. There’s absolutely nothing relevant about publishing his name even if it’s public record. Let the courts deal with him. And he’s not even convicted yet. You don’t really feel threatened, do you?

  • miraculous

    Akash Maharaj, English Major
    I’ve wanted to visit Ghana ever since I read Ayi Kewi Armah’s “The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born.” In that wonderful novel Ghana is rendered the perfect symbol of the post-colonial state – ceaseless revolutions, the insidiousness of capitalism, the alienation of the individual and at the end, the faint promise, the ignis fatuus of something better. I was so moved by the novel that I always wanted to visit Ghana and my interest increased after learning about this course and being very much interested in the experience of the Middle Passage. To me, African American history IS American History and while I’ve had the pleasure of pursuing this interest in Literature and History courses, I fear that my experience has been largely abstract. There is something visceral, and far more emotional, about this kind of tragic history. A response that you cannot get from just sitting in a classroom analyzing and interpreting, but rather through experience. So I wanted to go to Ghana to add that missing element to my undergraduate career – to add the visceral to the abstract, to allow for a real emotional response that cannot be easily contained, dissected or explained. There’s an element of the miraculous at the end of Armah’s novel that cannot be understood in any literary or academic sense, and I would like to experience that myself.

  • miraculous

    Akash Maharaj, English Major
    I’ve wanted to visit Ghana ever since I read Ayi Kewi Armah’s “The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born.” In that wonderful novel Ghana is rendered the perfect symbol of the post-colonial state – ceaseless revolutions, the insidiousness of capitalism, the alienation of the individual and at the end, the faint promise, the ignis fatuus of something better. I was so moved by the novel that I always wanted to visit Ghana and my interest increased after learning about this course and being very much interested in the experience of the Middle Passage. To me, African American history IS American History and while I’ve had the pleasure of pursuing this interest in Literature and History courses, I fear that my experience has been largely abstract. There is something visceral, and far more emotional, about this kind of tragic history. A response that you cannot get from just sitting in a classroom analyzing and interpreting, but rather through experience. So I wanted to go to Ghana to add that missing element to my undergraduate career – to add the visceral to the abstract, to allow for a real emotional response that cannot be easily contained, dissected or explained. There’s an element of the miraculous at the end of Armah’s novel that cannot be understood in any literary or academic sense, and I would like to experience that myself.

  • @jackson5

    it’s news. his name is news. the details are news. when you commit a crime and are arrested, your name is public. journalism tends to revolve around publishing concrete facts, not vague skeletons of stories.

  • @jackson5

    it’s news. his name is news. the details are news. when you commit a crime and are arrested, your name is public. journalism tends to revolve around publishing concrete facts, not vague skeletons of stories.

  • @@jackson5

    Agreed. His name is news. What really confirmed it for me was when I facebooked him and saw that we had friends in common. Don’t the people who *knew* him at Yale deserve to know what’s up? Given that he sounds like a very unstable, deceptive person, I wonder what other interpersonal messes he got himself into.

  • @@jackson5

    Agreed. His name is news. What really confirmed it for me was when I facebooked him and saw that we had friends in common. Don’t the people who *knew* him at Yale deserve to know what’s up? Given that he sounds like a very unstable, deceptive person, I wonder what other interpersonal messes he got himself into.

  • Chas

    Back in the sixties I heard that three or so Harvardians had once been expelled…actually, expunged…after financing a Harvard education for the dog of one of them. The dog apparently took classes the roommates had taken the previous year, and the roommates took turns taking the dog’s exams. I think they got away with it for a couple of years. Expungement, quite rare at Harvard and is the worst punishment the institution offers.

  • Chas

    Back in the sixties I heard that three or so Harvardians had once been expelled…actually, expunged…after financing a Harvard education for the dog of one of them. The dog apparently took classes the roommates had taken the previous year, and the roommates took turns taking the dog’s exams. I think they got away with it for a couple of years. Expungement, quite rare at Harvard and is the worst punishment the institution offers.

  • Correction

    Attending Harvard is the worst punishment Harvard offers.

  • Correction

    Attending Harvard is the worst punishment Harvard offers.

  • EvilYalie @ Correction

    Too true. That and having to maintain an air of superiority when there is no evidence that Harvard is even worthy of sucking Yale’s proverbial dick (or even P-ton’s for that matter).

  • EvilYalie @ Correction

    Too true. That and having to maintain an air of superiority when there is no evidence that Harvard is even worthy of sucking Yale’s proverbial dick (or even P-ton’s for that matter).

  • @Y11

    why don’t you run along and go do some homework now?

  • @Y11

    why don’t you run along and go do some homework now?

  • WhoMissedThisGuy

    I’m surprised no one has heard that the recently outed president of the Columbia GS student council, Niko Cunningham, fraudulently claims Yale alum status. It’s up on his Facebook profile for all to see.

  • WhoMissedThisGuy

    I’m surprised no one has heard that the recently outed president of the Columbia GS student council, Niko Cunningham, fraudulently claims Yale alum status. It’s up on his Facebook profile for all to see.