Princeton Gossips, Start Freaking Out

Princeton Gossips, Start Freaking OutNew Jersey prosecutors have subpoenaed records from JuicyCampus. Since Princeton is the only New Jersey school currently enjoying Juicy’s services, this is definitely about you, Princeton person who posted about the girl whose “vagine hang like sleeve of wizard.”

New Jersey Attorney General Ann Milgram is going after the beleaguered but wildly popular gossip site for violating the state’s Consumer Fraud Act because, according to the Associated Press, “it doesn’t allow offensive material but provid[es] no enforcement of that rule.” Which is funny, because we always thought JuicyCampus existed precisely for the promulgation of offensive material. In fact, you could say Matt Ivester is the laissez-faire Nick Summers. (That comparison is entirely nonsensical, but I like that I got to use the letter ‘z,’ so it stays.)

Since Milgram is going after the site, not its users, your Google caches and future employability are probably safe. But since you all have anxiety disorders anyway, feel free to grab a brown paper bag and start hyperventilating.

NJ Office of the Attorney General’s press release after the jump. 

from the Attorney General’s press site:

NEWARK – A website that publishes anonymous gossip about college students, some identified by first and last name and dormitory, has been subpoenaed by the Office of the Attorney General and the Division of Consumer Affairs as part of a state investigation into the operation of the college gossip website.

The state is investigating whether JuicyCampus.com is violating the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act through unconscionable commercial practices and misrepresentations to users. The state’s subpoena, issued to site owner Lime Blue, L.L.C. of Reno, Nevada, requests information about how the company selects “supported campuses” as identified on its web site, how the school affiliation of posters is verified and how it implements the Parental Consent Forms it requires for posters under 18 years old, among other items. New Jersey’s Princeton University is listed as a supported campus.

“Misrepresentation to the public by businesses violates our Consumer Fraud Act,” Attorney General Anne Milgram said. “JuicyCampus.com must honor the terms and conditions that it informs the public it will adhere to.”

Postings on JuicyCampus.com include uncomplimentary references to the physical characteristics, race, ethnicity and implied sexual experiences of students. The site’s User Conduct Terms require posters to agree that they will not post content that is abusive, obscene or invasive of another’s privacy. JuicyCampus.com tells the public that this offensive content may be removed, but the site apparently lacks tools to report or dispute this material.

The state issued a second subpoena to Adbrite, Inc., a San Francisco-based online advertising company that advertises on the JuicyCampus.com web site. The state is requesting information about the business relationship between Adbrite and JuicyCampus.com in order to determine how JuicyCampus.com represented its operation to Adbrite, including the types of ads and advertising keywords requested by JuicyCampus.com.

Additionally, the State sent a letter to Google, Inc., to inquire about the company’s prior business relationship with JuicyCampus.com. Advertising provided through Google’s AdSense Online Program no longer appear on JuicyCampus.com

Consumer Affairs’ E-Commerce Investigative Unit is leading the investigation of JuicyCampus.com, along with Assistant Attorney General James Savage.

  • p’11

    about damn time! hope this lawsuit shuts down the site.

  • p’11

    about damn time! hope this lawsuit shuts down the site.

  • Oh well

    Hey, all the viciousness was written by and directed towards self-absorbed socialites, so who cares.

  • Oh well

    Hey, all the viciousness was written by and directed towards self-absorbed socialites, so who cares.

  • @p’11

    translation: I’m a self-righteous little twat who doesn’t grasp the irony of him posting anonymously on the internet about how bad internet anonymity is.

  • @p’11

    translation: I’m a self-righteous little twat who doesn’t grasp the irony of him posting anonymously on the internet about how bad internet anonymity is.

  • rufus

    I’m sure juicy campus has deeply hurt the feelings of, at the outside, 5 or 6 princeton students. It’s so fun though, and aren’t our first amendment rights worth more than the feelings of a few dicks who, lets face it, are probably pretty emotionally limited to begin with?

    If it goes under I guess we’ll just have to post our juiciest tidbits right here…

  • rufus

    I’m sure juicy campus has deeply hurt the feelings of, at the outside, 5 or 6 princeton students. It’s so fun though, and aren’t our first amendment rights worth more than the feelings of a few dicks who, lets face it, are probably pretty emotionally limited to begin with?

    If it goes under I guess we’ll just have to post our juiciest tidbits right here…

  • rufus

    i’m sorry, that last part sounded really stupid

  • rufus

    i’m sorry, that last part sounded really stupid

  • Thaddeus

    I have a white board outside my Princeton dorm room… anyone can write anything on it, the marker is right there, hope I am not issued a subpoena.

  • Thaddeus

    I have a white board outside my Princeton dorm room… anyone can write anything on it, the marker is right there, hope I am not issued a subpoena.

  • Princeton 2008

    Seems like a dubious basis on which to proceed. Censorship by the state is always a risky road to go down. Today, you’re not allowed to report on what happens at the street. Tomorrow, you can’t criticize the government. By Thursday, the government’s actively editing and messing with everything that’s printed. Welcome to Beijing.

  • Princeton 2008

    Seems like a dubious basis on which to proceed. Censorship by the state is always a risky road to go down. Today, you’re not allowed to report on what happens at the street. Tomorrow, you can’t criticize the government. By Thursday, the government’s actively editing and messing with everything that’s printed. Welcome to Beijing.